The Land Rover Owners Wife

Peter Pan Cardigan in mint King Cole Babyglitz: pockets

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The pocket lining in place and the stitches that will become the pocket border

The pocket lining in place and the stitches that will become the pocket border

So with another teacher at school about to go on maternity leave, I decided to take a couple of days break from knitting for the Mudlets, in order to knit up a little jacket for the expected baby girl. I rummaged through my patterns and came across a pattern I had last knitted up for Little Mudlet when she was five.
One completed pocket lining and the second one under construction

One completed pocket lining and the second one under construction

This pattern starts at size 0-6 months and although the pattern itself is relatively plain, comprising as it does of 90 percent stocking stitch, it does have a pretty lace edge and a short lace panel worked up the center of each front section. However, this pattern is transformed into charmingly sweet, if you choose the right sort of yarn. When I made it for Little Mudlet, she choose a Cerise pink double knit with a shiny, pink thread running through it and even now, slightly too small and a bit worn looking, it still sparkles much to the delight of its’ owner.

The pocket border stitches were put onto a stitch holder

The pocket border stitches were put onto a stitch holder

The pattern is clearly designed for girls and as such this time, I have deviated from the normal pastel pink, yellow or cream, that many new born baby girl garments are knitted in and have chosen King Cole Babyglitz in mint. Like Little Mudlets’ pink version of this cardigan, the mint yarn has a sparkly thread running through it which adds just a touch of glamour to the jacket and the beautifully soft shade of mint perfectly mirrors the super soft feel of the knitted sections.

And the stitches from one of the linings were moved onto the needle

And the stitches from one of the linings were moved onto the needle

Baby garments knit up incredibly quickly (I have already completed the back, both front sections and a sleeve ….. since Tuesday evening) and so I will wait until it is finished before I do the main post about this project. However, this pattern also features pockets and I thought I’d show how these were made and incorporated into the front sections.

Before being knitted across to form a complete row again

Before being knitted across to form a complete row again

Firstly, I knitted up two separate 14 row pocket linings, keeping the first one on the needle whilst I worked the second one. Once both were finished I moved them both onto a stitch holder.

The back view of the newly places pocket lining

The back view of the newly places pocket lining

Next I cast on the first, tiny front section and worked my way through the first part of the instructions until I reached the ‘Place Pocket’ section. I was instructed to knit the first 5 stitches from my needle and then put the next 14 stitches onto a stitch holder.

Then I needed to knit the 14 stitches of one of the pocket linings from the stitch holder before knitting the last 8 stitches from the needle. This meant that I finished the row with the pocket lining sitting behind part of the front section and a stitch holder at the front of the piece, holding the 14 stitches which will become the pocket border in due course.

The pockets are tiny but will look incredibly sweet when the jacket is finished later this weekend.

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2 thoughts on “Peter Pan Cardigan in mint King Cole Babyglitz: pockets

  1. I’d never considered that you can incorporate a pocket whilst you were knitting. I had always assumed it was something you had to sew on after. Lovely colour.

    • Thanks Lucy, I do like the colour – it’s such a nice change to the normal pinks, creams but still looks girly and pretty because of the sparkle and pattern :)

      As for the pockets, this is the only pattern I have with pockets, so I don’t know if this is the normal way to do pockets but these were very easy to do :)

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