The Land Rover Owners Wife


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The fruits of my labour

Already the colour difference between the leeks can be seen

Already the colour difference between the leeks can be seen

Two days of almost solid rain, has had the usual dramatic affect on my garden, that watering by hose pipe, sprinkler or watering simply can’t achieve. Everywhere I look the lush green of healthy plants can be seen, although, as we head into the last month of summer, this is now interspersed with the yellowing of plants, past their prime which even the magical powers of Ma Natures rain can’t revive. Continue reading

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Mid season tidy up

Water cress sitting in a  tray of water.

I’ve never grown water cress before but thought putting the pots into a tray of water might aid growth.

I am my own worst enemy in the garden at times, especially when it comes to creating more work for myself but I get busy doing something, I don’t want to stop and so things get put to one side, to be tidied away once I’ve finished. But of course then I start something else and the nett result is an untidy mess, taking up twice as much space, making it difficult to find items I need. Continue reading


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Improvisation in the greenhouse

The areas under the fleece frames are full to bursting

The areas under the fleece frames are full to bursting

You may remember that back in February I thought that I had a problem called ‘Damping Off‘ in my seed trays, as my seedlings did not appear to be doing so well. So to ensure that we had sufficient tomato, chilli, sweet pepper and cucumber plants for the year, I sowed a whole load more and hoped for the best. Well it would appear that ‘Sods Law’ has kicked in because despite my fears to the contrary, the original batch of seedlings all pulled themselves together and suddenly decided to thrive which I am convinced wouldn’t have happened, had I not sown replacement seeds (that’s the ‘Sods Law’ bit) AND the replacement seeds have also germinated in huge numbers and thrived. Continue reading


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A bit of a gamble

The framework in place for my fleece covers.

The framework in place for my fleece covers.

With my lovely clean large greenhouse taunting me with oodles of space, I turned my attention to my slightly over crowded propagators full of tomatoes, chillies and sweet peppers, not to mention cucumbers and more flowers, that had taken over the house and realised that I needed to do something about potting on some of the seedlings. Armed with 4 bags of freshly bought all purpose compost, I grabbed a tray of mixed tomato seedlings and made my way to the greenhouse. Continue reading


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Another big job ticked off the list.

From green to clean in four hours

From green to clean in four hours, these roof panels were thickly coated with algae

Not only was the sun shining on Sunday morning but there was actually some comforting warmth amidst its’ rays and with no wind to chase away that welcome warmth, the stage was set for one of the biggest preparation jobs of the growing season – greenhouse cleaning! Continue reading


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End of Summer Garden Update

Little Elf chilles on the staging and Ohnivecs on the ground.

Little Elf chilles on the staging and Ohnivecs on the ground.

As the year moves along at a steady pace and we merrily wend our way in to September, the garden is starting to look more than a little tired. All hopes of a giant pumpkin have been dashed with only one plant producing a small but perfectly formed specimen and a mental note has been made to revert back to tried and tested varieties of pumpkin and squash next year, as the disappointment of only three or four fruits across a dozen plants, for the second year running, is not a good feeling. That said and in spite of annual additions of manure or chicken manure pellets etc, I suspect that the beds all need a huge amount of enrichment after 5 or 6 years of use and so some investment in fresh topsoil, compost, manure and fish blood and bone will need to be made this autumn. Also, unlike last year when I tried the ‘no dig’ approach to soil enrichment, I will be digging in this autumn, to ensure that the nutrients will be available to the root systems of next years crops.

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Friends and surprises in the garden

I thought I'd try and arty shot of a sweet corn plants

I thought I’d try an arty shot of a sweet corn plants

As I have wondered around my garden over the last few days, checking the progress of my plants, I have been delighted to see a host of tiny friends, busily munching their way through the thousands of aphids and blackfly, that have occupied every available bit of green. Everywhere I look I see them, these garden friends and a very welcome sight they are and whilst the Harlequin is by far the most common variety in my garden, I have seen a few Cream Spots and Two Spots hanging around as well. You see what I have in abundance at the moment are baby Ladybirds, dozens and dozens of them.

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A touch too green for a greenhouse

Chocolate Cherry, Amish Paste (in the middle slot), sulky side shoots and a cucumber.

Chocolate Cherry, Amish Paste (in the middle slot), sulky side shoots and a cucumber.

I had been putting it off for a while (again) but this weekend, with some unexpectedly dry (although generally dull and overcast for the most part) weather on Sunday and Bank Holiday Monday, I finally started the laborious task of cleaning the greenhouses. To be completely honest, it was the need to set up the growbags for the tomatoes and cucumbers that was the driving force behind my spring clean and so I set to and started to clear out the smallest of the greenhouses.

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The Winter Garden: an update

Last years strawberry runners are liking the greenhouse

Last years strawberry runners are liking the greenhouse

The air was crisp but the sun was shining first thing this morning and so with the Mudlets delivered to school I decided to take a stroll down to my vegetable patch and greenhouses, to check on the progress of the various plants. Continue reading


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The Chillies get a trim

The select few, sprayed and ready for the insulated greenhouse

The select few chilli plants: sprayed and ready for the insulated greenhouse

Walking into the Large Greenhouse the other day, a couple of things caught my attention: the chicory/raddichio were covered in white fly and the chillis were definitely past their best.

First job was the eviction of the infested plants and their relocation into the compost bin, with the lid left off for a while to allow any passing birds unimpeded access to the feast. The empty pots were then stacked and left outside of and away from the greenhouse until I could clean them. Continue reading